User ID
Password
  Forgot User ID
or Register Today!
VegasInsider.com
VI Mobile Scores and Betting OddsVI Mobile Scores and Betting Odds Be Social
Home
NFL
NBA
NHL
MLB
NCAA FB
NCAA BK
Golf
Auto
Horses
Soccer
Boxing/MMA
More
Betting Tools

 
Athletes pursue lawsuit against NCAA

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) - Former college basketball standout Ed O'Bannon and his lawyers sought on Thursday to dramatically expand his lawsuit challenging the NCAA's ban on compensating athletes in a move that could expose the organization and its member schools to billions of dollars in damages.

Advertisement
O'Bannon and his lawyers asked a federal court judge to turn their antitrust lawsuit into a class action, representing thousands of former and current college athletes. The lawsuit demands that the NCAA find a way to cut players in on the billions of dollars earned by college sports from live broadcasts, memorabilia sales, video games and in other areas.

U.S. District Court Judge Claudia Wilken didn't rule on either the merits of O'Bannon's case or his demands to turn the case into a class action. It could take weeks, even months, before Wilken rules.

Instead, she ordered O'Bannon's lawyers to revise the lawsuit to fix some legal technicalities, including explicating adding current players to the lawsuit. Lawyer Michael Hausfeld said he will file a new lawsuit that includes current players, but will seek to keep their names confidential.

``They are afraid of retaliation,'' Hausfeld told the court.

NCAA lawyer Greg Curtner is against certifying the lawsuit as a class action, arguing that the claims of thousands of collegiate athletes are too different to be treated the same. For instance, certain athletes bring in more revenue than others and have different legal claims at stake.

The NCAA argues that many of the athletes receive scholarships in exchange for playing sports and to pay student athletes would ruin amateur athletics. To pay athletes more than that would ruin collegiate sports, the NCAA argues.

The debate over compensating college players is almost as old as the NCAA, founded in 1906. Amateurs have been expected to compete for free and the love of sport - or at least the cost of a scholarship and the pursuit of an education.

The NCAA is steadfast in its position that student-athletes are prohibited from receiving payment for participating in sports. It also says it has done nothing wrong in marketing itself for the benefit of its member schools and will continue to vigorously contest the lawsuits

But the NCAA's revenues have skyrocketed in recent years - it recently signed a $10.8 billion, 14-year television deal for basketball - and so have the demands of athletes to share in the money.

``I'm doing this for change,'' O'Bannon said outside court.

The star of the NCAA 1995 basketball champion UCLA Bruins traveled from his Las Vegas home to attend the hearing Thursday.

He said he first became aware that others were profiting from his image in 1995, when he visited a friend's house and was shown an avatar resembling O'Bannon playing for the 1995 Bruins in the game. Two years later, he filed a lawsuit that focused attention from lawmakers, college administrators and others on just how much money the NCAA and its member schools earn each year.

The schools argue that money-making sports like football and baseball help support sports such as volleyball and gymnastics with smaller fan bases.

That may be, O'Bannon said, but he still thinks student athletes who help generate the revenues are entitled to a cut.

``I believe the kids coming through the system can do better than I did,'' he said. ``I never thought this lawsuit would get this big, but now that it has, I hope it forces big changes.''

Copyright 2017 by STATS LLC and Associated Press.
Any commercial use or distribution without the express written
consent of STATS LLC and Associated Press is strictly prohibited.

  
HEADLINES
Schwab: Big Monday Tip Sheet
Williams: Top 25 Betting Recap
Marshall: Bracketology Update
Villanova, Kansas stay 1-2 in AP Top 25
Gonzaga lands at No. 3, gaining respect
Defense fuels resurgence at Illinois State
Kentucky wary of upset as it meets Vols
MORE HEADLINES
 
Why Buy Picks From VegasInsider.com
NCAA BK College Basketball Handicapper Sports Picks Records
NCAA BK Hot Streaks
12-2 L14 Guarantees, 12-3 L5 Days
9-2 Run, 31-15 G-Plays, +2,135 TY
11-3 Run, 21-7 Picks, 12-3 G-Plays
11-1 G-Plays, 6-1 Y'day, 36-18 L54
8-4 L2 Days, 15-6 L21 Streak
6-3 Totals, 11-6 G-Plays, +2,641 TY
4-1 L5 Picks, 9-2 L11 G-Plays
4-0 L4 Guaranteed Plays
2-0 Saturday, 10-4 L14 Guarantees
4-1 CBK Record Sunday
5-1 L6 Over/Under Plays
4-2 L3 Days, 60% +1,167 TY
NCAA BK Basketball Expert Sports Picks - North Carolina State Wolfpack at Duke Blue Devils
2016 CBK SEASON PICK RECORDS
Money Leaders
Handicapper Money
NeiltheGreek + 2641
Bruce Marshall + 2151
Bill Marzano + 2135
Last 7 Day Leaders
Handicapper Money
Antony Dinero + 1483
Don Anthony + 940
Scott Rickenbach + 778
Percentage Leaders
Handicapper Pct
Michael Black 60 %
Brian Edwards 60 %
Don Anthony 59 %
Guaranteed Leaders
Handicapper Money
Bill Marzano + 1347
Scott Rickenbach + 1005
Brian Edwards + 715
Over-Under Leaders
Handicapper Money
NeiltheGreek + 2111
Antony Dinero + 1276
Bill Marzano + 615
Member Leaders
Handicapper Money
Kyle Hunter + 1634
Bruce Marshall + 1470
NeiltheGreek + 1265
MORE PICK RECORDS
  
corner graphic
With a VI Gold Membership, you can SAVE 10% off a Live Odds subscription, SAVE 20% off Daily Pick packages, and receive access to up to 1,000 Member Plays each month!
VI Gold Membership